16 search results
  • Science Summary: Dairy & Cardiovascular Disease
    March 2, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy & Cardiovascular Disease

    The latest research: Dairy foods such as milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy eating patterns that contribute important shortfall nutrients, including calcium, vitamin D and potassium. Low-fat and fat-free dairy foods are part of current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and American Heart Association (AHA) dietary recommendations. Read this Science Summary on dairy and cardiovascular disease for more.
  • Science Summary: Dairy & Nutrient Contributions
    February 3, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy & Nutrient Contributions

    The latest research: Consumption of milk and milk products is associated with better bone health, especially in children and adolescents, and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and lower blood pressure in adults. Read this Science Summary on dairy and nutrient contributions to learn more.
  • Science Summary: Dairy & Lactose Intolerance
    February 3, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy & Lactose Intolerance

    The latest research: Lactose intolerance (LI) may lead some individuals to avoid or decrease dairy food consumption, which can decrease essential nutrient consumption and may be associated with chronic disease risk. Objective diagnosis and individualized management strategies can help many Americans who experience LI to include dairy foods in their eating patterns. Read this Science Summary on dairy and lactose intolerance for more.
  • Science Summary: Milk & Beverage Trends
    February 3, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Milk & Beverage Trends

    The latest research: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) lists low-fat or fat-free-milk, water, and 100% fruit juice among recommended beverages, and discourages consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) such as soda and fruit drinks to help reduce excess calories. Read our Science Summary on milk and beverage trends to learn more.
  • Science Summary: Dairy & Blood Pressure
    March 2, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy & Blood Pressure

    The latest research: A growing body of research indicates that dairy food consumption is associated with multiple health benefits, including lower blood pressure. This summary reviews studies about dairy food consumption and blood pressure published between 2009 and 2014. Read this Science Summary on dairy and blood pressure for more.
  • Science Summary: Dairy & Peak Bone Mass
    March 18, 2016 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy & Peak Bone Mass

    The latest research: Reaching peak bone mass is associated with reduced risk osteoporosis later in life. Research continues to support the current DGA recommendations to consume three servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy foods for children and adolescents ages 9 years and older as part of a nutrient-rich diet, along with adequate physical activity, to help achieve peak bone mass. Read this Science Summary on dairy and peak bone mass for more.
  • Science Summary: Cardiovascular Disease
    June 26, 2018 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Cardiovascular Disease

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 31% of all deaths in recent years. A growing body of research indicates that dairy food consumption is associated with multiple health benefits, and a 2016 review concluded that dairy food consumption is not linked to higher risk for CVD or coronary artery disease (CAD), and it is linked to lower risk for stroke.
  • Science Summary: Blood Pressure
    June 25, 2018 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Blood Pressure

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research indicates that dairy food consumption is associated with multiple health benefits, and a 2016 review concluded that total dairy food consumption is linked to lower risk for high blood pressure. This research provides further support for consuming low-fat or fat-free dairy foods as recommended in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. You can download our full report, Science Summary: Blood Pressure, which explores how total dairy consumption is linked to lower risk for high blood pressure.
  • Science Summary: Milk & Your Health
    June 27, 2018 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Milk & Your Health

    Milk is a delicious and nutritious beverage produced fresh in every U.S. state. Dairy foods like milk are foundational foods in healthy eating patterns, which include low-fat and fat-free dairy foods. Healthy eating patterns are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Eating dairy is also linked to improved bone health, especially in children and adolescents.
  • Science Summary: Dairy in Healthy Eating Plans
    July 25, 2018 • pdf • nationaldairycouncil.org

    Science Summary: Dairy in Healthy Eating Plans

    Dairy foods, such as milk, cheese and yogurt, are foundational foods included in multiple eating patterns, including the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA), the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan, eating patterns recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) and guidelines from the National Osteoporosis Foundation. There are many reasons why dairy is included in these healthy eating plans. Dairy foods help meet nutrient needs and are associated with better bone health, especially in children and adolescents. Healthy eating patterns containing low-fat or fat-free dairy foods are also associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Dairy foods can be affordable sources of key nutrients including high-quality protein, calcium, potassium and vitamin D and are available in a variety of options to help meet taste, health and wellness needs. You can download our full report, "Science Summary: Dairy in Healthy Eating Plans," to learn more about how you can enjoy the many benefits dairy provides.